Guysborough County Genealogy

Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, Canada

Gazetteer of Guysborough County

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Peas Brook: - GPS: 45.350788,-61.337063
PEAS BROOK, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located about half way between Crow Harbour and Halfway Cove, on the south side of Chedabucto Bay on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. It is supposed to have received this name because of the plentiful growth of wild peas found near the brook. The last was part of the Guysborough township grant given to Nathan Hubbill and seventy-eight other refugees of the American Revolutionary War.
Fishing is the main industry. Population in 1956 was 95.
PEASBROOK, Guysborough County2
This place is supposed to have received its name because of the plentiful growth of wild peas found near the brook; was first settled about the year 1760.
Philips Harbour (1769) - GPS: 45.34732,-61.238573
PHILIPS HARBOUR, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located about half way between Crow Harbour and Half Island Cove on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. It may have been named after an early settler and was also called "Phillip Cove." The land was part of a grant made to Nicol Bower in 1769. Ruins of several houses and stores were found by early British settlers which supposedly belonged to French inhabitants.
A Baptist Church stood here in the early 1870's. A schoolhouse was built in 1946 and was put into use for the 1946-47 school term.
Fishing is the basic industry. Population in 1956 was 134.
Pirate Harbour (1785) - GPS: 45.5838,-61.384742
PIRATE HARBOUR, Guysborough County1
Pirate CoveThis is the name of a cove with some settlement located around it, on the west side of the strait of Canso, on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. The name was given because of legends that the cove was used by Captain Kidd, Paul Jones, and others of that type for refit, wintering or hiding. It was generally used more in reference to the cove than to the settlement. The Indian name was Tesogwode , "place where goods were sorted."
John Wilson and John Peeples received a thousand acre grant here in 1785. In 1805 the Wilson half of the grant was escheated and regranted to John Peeples. The next lot south was granted to Captain Austin, Royal Navy, escheated in 1818, and regranted to Bryant Rogers in 1820.
A school-house was built in 1867. A postal way office was established in 1859.
Fishing is the basic industry.
PIRATES HARBOR or COVE, Guysborough County2
On the Strait of Canso. Called by the Indians "Tesogwode," meaning "the place where goods were sorted" or "Place of Flakes." It is said to have been a resort for pirates in the olden days. Nearby is a small island and between this island and the shore there was a safe anchorage and an excellent hiding place for small vessels.
Piscatiquie (Piscatiqui) Island (1738) - GPS: 45.343791,-60.981295
PISCATIQUIE ISLAND, Guysborough County1
Piscatiqui and George Islands are separated only at high tide form the north side of Canso Harbour on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. On Thomas Durell's 1732 survey the islands are called Little Canso Island and Great Canso Island, and a fort is shown on the latter (George Island). The Atlantic Neptune, published in 1781, has "Binney Island" for Piscatiqui and Canso Island for George. In the 1760' s and 1770' s there was some settlement on both islands. Piscatiqui or Piscataqua is probably an Anglicized Indian name. George Island was named in honour of one of the monarchs. One of the grants of land, made to Captain Patrick Heron, dates from 1738. In April, 1822, John Lanigan of Ireland and George Norris of Halifax, both residents of Canso since June, 1821, petitioned for land on these islands. The grant was made in 1824.
Fishing is the main industry.
Porcupine Cove - GPS: 45.647378,-61.436112
See AULDS COVE
Port Bickerton - GPS: 45.108363,-61.727679
PORT BICKERTON, Guysborough County1
De-icing, Port BickertonThis settlement is located on the harbour of that name on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. It is probably named after Admiral Sir Richard Hussey Bickerton (1759-1832). In 1818 there were two families settled here. Permanent settlement began about 1855.
A school-house was built in 1874. In 1903-1904 a new school was erected.
Fishing is the main industry. In 1877 there was a lobster processing factory here owned by American interests. Bickerton Co-Op Ltd. was begun about 1941 as Bickerton Fisheries Ltd. It was incorporated as Bickerton Co-Op Ltd. In 1948.
Population in 1956 was: Bickerton West 192, Port Bickerton, 183.
PORT BICKERTON, Guysborough County2
This place is said to have been named in honor of an English Lord Bickerton, who was ViceAdmiral some time on the West Indian Station.
Port Felix (1808) - GPS: 45.249664,-61.219089
PORT FELIX, Guysborough County1
This settlement is located on the eastern side of Tor Bay, on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. "Wolunkak" was the Indian name, meaning "scooped out place." The place received the name Molasses Harbour when a cask of molasses washed ashore about the time the first settlers arrived. In 1869 the name Port Felix was given in honor of Rev. Felix Von Blerk, the Parish Priest. There were seven French Acadian families here about 1808-1811. Most of the land was granted in 1851 and 1852 to:
Frederick and Matthew David, Edward, Alexander and Dominick Boudrot at Port Felix and to: Thomas Richard, Joseph Fougere, Joseph David, Jr. and Simon Pelraine at Port Felix East. The names of Matthew and Joseph David as well as members of the Boudrot, Richard, and Pelraine families are included in the 1817 census for Torby (Tor Bay).
A Roman Catholic Church was constructed before 1877.
A postal way office was established at Molasses Harbour in 1854.
Fishing is the main industry.
Population in 1956 was: Port Felix East, 165, Port Felix West, 91.
Port Felix. a post settlement in Guysboro Co., 30 miles from Guysboro, fare $1.25, it contains two stores, Can. express, pop. 200. (listing from 1892 McAlpines Guide & Gazeteer to the Maritime Provinces)
Port Felix was originally called 'Havre Mélasse or Molasses Harbour. The name was changed in 1869 to Port Felix in honour of the Belgian Priest, Felix van Blerk.
Some of the family names found there over the years are, David, Grover, Gice, Cashin, LeBlanc, Pellerin / Pelrine Boudreau, Fougere, Doiron, Levangie / Levandier, Meagher / Marr, Bellefontaine, Jelleau, Richard, King / Roi, Munro(e), Avery.
Also see: The Acadians Of Tor Bay, Guysborough County
Port Felix East - GPS: 45.25187,-61.200807
See PORT FELIX
Port Hilford (1810) - GPS: 45.105182,-61.848825
PORT HILLFORD, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located at the head of Indian Harbour on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. The Indian name was Utkogumoogwode, "where the tomcods resort in the fall." The early name, "Indian Harbour" was probably given because the place was a favourite resort of the Indians who reputedly had a number of large settlements in the area. The name "Port Hilford," may have been given for three of the characteristics of the area; that it was a minor seaport, there were hills here, and there was a ford over a small stream which flowed from Indian Harbour Lake into Indian Harbour.
The Rude family settled here in 1810 and there were thirty persons here in 1818. Two hundred acres of land were surveyed for Asa Rude on land originally granted to Alexander McNutt on the east side of the harbour.
An Anglican church was erected in 1855. A Baptist church was begun in 1845, completed in 1853.
A school was established in June, 1834, with John Coombe as schoolmaster. A school-house was built about 1836. Another. school-house was erected in 1865. A new school was completed at Port Hillford in 1888.
A postal way office was established at Indian Harbour in 1849.
Fishing is the basic industry. Population in 1956 was 59.
Port Shoreham (1786) - GPS: 45.425925,-61.416078
PORT SHOREHAM, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located on the north side of Moose Bay, the head of Chedabucto Bay on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. The Indian name was probably Assugadich, "clam ground." The early English name was Clam Harbour, but this was changed to Port Shoreham by Act of Legislature in 1901. This name means "a village beside the shore" and may have been given in imitation of the original name for Chester township, "Shoreham." The area was part of Manchester township which was settled by Loyalists about 1786.
William Pritsch was schoolmaster at Ragged Head in 1831, and Moses McLean taught at Clam Harbour in 1832. In 1907 a new school-house was erected to replace one which had burned down and which had probably been erected in 1867.
The basic industries are farming and fishing. Population in 1956 was 76.
PORT SHOREHAM, Guysborough County2
In 1901 an Act was passed by Parliament changing the old name of this place "Clam Harbor" to Port Shoreham, after the sea port town in Sussex, England.
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Queensport (1792) - GPS: 45.339085,-61.261189
QUEENSPORT, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located on Crow Harbour on the south side of Chedabucto Bay on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. The Indian name was Wedonik, "having a mouth." The early English name was Crow Harbour, but this was changed by act of the Legislature in 1898 to Queensport in honor of the diamond , Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Settlement was begun here by fishermen prior to 1811. As early as April, 1792, there were buildings on the Stirling grant.
The S. P. G. Report for 1792 refers to a chapel of ease lately erected by the inhabitants of one of the (Guysborough parish) districts, called Union Chapel, which may have been here. A Methodist Church was purchased by the Anglican congregation in the 1920's. Christ Church Anglican was· built about 1942. A Baptist Church was opened April 9, 1876, but it was blown down in a storm and a new church was erected soon after. St. Vincent De Paul Roman Catholic Church was begun in 1897, completed in 1901.
John Diggoon was schoolmaster here in 1834. A new school-house was erected in 1876. Another new school was built in 1905.
A postal way office was established in 1855.
Fishing is the main industry. Queensport is noted for its mackerel and herring fisheries.
Population in 1956 was 102.
QUEENPORT, Guysborough County2
This place which was at one time known as Crow Harbor, was named in honor of Queen Victoria in 1897, being her Diamond Jubilee year. The Act confirming its name was passed in 1898. The Indian name for Crow Harbor was "Wedoonik" meaning "having a mouth."
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Riverside (1785) - GPS: 45.425172,-61.5113
RIVERSIDE, Guysborough County1
This rural area is located on the north side of Milford Haven on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. The name is descriptive and was given by the Loyalist settlers who came here from New England in 1784. The land was part of a 30,000 acre grant made to Captain Richard Brownrigg and many others in 1785, most of them members of the disbanded 71st Regiment.
A new school-house was built in 1876 to replace one destroyed by fire three years before.
Farming is the basic industry.
Population of North Riverside in 1956 was 60.
Roachvale (1788) - GPS: 45.354648,-61.546533
ROACHVALE, Guysborough County1
United Church, RoachvaleThis rural area is located on the Salmon River west of the head of Chedabucto Bay on the eastern shore of Nova Scotia. About 1876 the inhabitants agreed to call the place "Rochevale" in honor of Rev. Peter De la Roche, the first rector of Christ Church, Guysborough. The Post Office Department misspelled the name "Roachvale." James Imlay came to this part of the province in 1787 and in 1788 obtained an order for survey of 150 acres of land. Shortly after, he purchased a farm and had a survey of 300 acres made at what is now West Roachvale.
A United Baptist Church was built in 1891, dedicated December 6, 1891.
A new school house was built in 1929. Farming is the basic industry.
Rogerton (1811) - GPS: 45.36475,-61.70155
ROGERTON. Guysborough County1
This settlement is located between Susie Lake and Salmon River Lake in eastern Nova Scotia. It was named after the Rogers family who lived here in the mid-19th century. The grantees in the area were: Alexander Morris and Samuel Sellon in 1811 and Winthrop Cook and John Cook, Jr.' in 1819. Sellon was an under foreman of shipwrights in the Halifax Naval Yard and asked for land in 1810. The Cooks were settled on their lard by 1818 and asked for a grant in that year.
Farming and lumbering are the basic industries.
Roman Valley (1829) - GPS: 45.460943,-61.762269
ROMAN VALLEY. Guysborough County1
Roman ValleyThis rural area is located on the Guysborough river, west of the head of Milford Haven in eastern Nova Scotia. This name was probably given by the early Irish settlers. The land was granted to John and Thomas Rogers, John Devereaux and Patrick Doucie, all of Ireland, who intended to settle thereon as soon as the grant was made in 1829. By 1857 the area was quite extensively settled.
Michael Roache was schoolmaster in 1835.
A postal way office was established in July, 1872, with Patrick Rogers as postmaster.
Farming is the main industry


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References

1: "Place Names of Place of Nova Scotia", Public Archives of Nova Scotia, 1974
2: "Nova Scotia Place Names", Thomas J. Brown, 1922
3: "Wikipedia", www.wikipedia.org